Visitors in the greenhouse

I was hoping to write a post about all of our garden progress (which is coming along quite well), but instead I’m writing about a few visitors we had this afternoon in our green house.

I got home from work and was planning on spending what was left of the sunlight out in the field transplanting tomatoes and peppers.  I brought Jonah and Isaac out with me to the greenhouse to help carry the plants while mom was inside getting Silas situated so she could come out and help too. I handed the boys a couple trays of tomatoes and basil to carry out to the field and then started to grab the trays of peppers. I picked up the first one, handed it off to to Jonah, turned to grab the second and right under my hand were our two unexpected visitors: copperheads. I’m assuming they were in the process of making little baby copperheads considering their intertwined position. Needless to say they’re no longer in my greenhouse.

copperheads coppperheads

Advertisements

15 responses to “Visitors in the greenhouse

      • Hi there. Yes we have rats and mice, but not in great quantities. I think the cats, hawks and stoats take care of them. We don’t really have much in the way of wildlife that can harm you – other than the odd bee sting. So the kids all run free through the fields barefoot for all of the summer without a care in the world.
        Cheers Sarah : o )

  1. Holyyyy mackel andy, as Amos used to say on the Amos and Andy show. How were they “disposed of”? Shall I call PETA to protest? Or call Mark Potok to put you on his terrorist list?…er…ah…

  2. Yikes! My mom used to tell me stories about her dog that would hunt copper heads and cme back puffed up to twice his normal size.

    However, in general I find that snakes aren’t dangerous if you know how to handle them and know they’re there. I know people who keep poisonous snakes for fun (or food). Personally, I would have bagged them and transported them to a woodsy area away from my house. Snakes are very important to the ecology of a forest.

    • I typically don’t like to kill anything that I’m not eating. I really hated to kill them and would have liked to relocated them. I’m not afraid of snakes but don’t have a lot of experience handling them so it was better safe then sorry this time. Next time I think I’ll try to move them off the property somewhere.

      • I spent my childhood playing with wild snakes in our local parks, and grew up to work at a pet-store for a time where many snakes were bitey. The trick is to keep behind the head. If you get the head pinned down with a stick, you can pick up the snake from behind the head safely and they’re pretty much harmless at that point. So if you can safely chop off the head, chances are you can pick ’em up too. Just stuff ’em in a bag and they can stay there for a day or so until you get out to the woods to release them. :3

        Also, you cn eat any snake… So you could eat those copper heads. ;P

      • Wow! That’s great to know. So don’t pick them up by the tail like they do on TV? I guess I’ve heard of people eating snake before but hadn’t thought of it. I might just do that next time. Thanks for the advice!

      • No, you should only do that if you have a “constrictor” type snake or know EXACTLY what you’re doing (I.E. have years of reading snake behavior). A snake can strike you if you’re holding it’s tail. They can support their whole body on only a couple of inches coiled around your pinky finger. No, the trick is to pin down the snake’s head with a stick and pick it up RIGHT behind it’s jaw. If you give it only a couple of inches it can turn to bite, so as close as humanly possible to it’s head. Thick gloves can help too.
        Once you have it’s head it’s all over. Unless it’s an 8-foot constrictor it can’t hurt you at that point. It should coil it’s body around your arm and struggle but if you keep a solid grip behind it’s jaw you’re fine. Good luck!

      • Right. You can wrap the head of the snake in the bag from the outside with your other hand and then just move your hand back quick. Also hence the gloves. ;3

  3. You could actually make a “snake tool” out of a long bamboo pole or other long staff-like object and some cord.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s